First Friday St. Lucy Novena Group

Sacred Eyes Tarot hosts a monthly invocation of St. Lucy via Zoom, to petition her aid in gaining greater clarity, be it in general living or in specific divination and mediumship practices.

In case I mess this embedding thing up, saintlytarotmystic on Instagram writes,

Join us as we pray the Chaplet of Saint Lucy, this Novena group is open to everyone, especially tarot readers, psychics, mediums, and anyone looking to develop their intuitive abilities. We will also invoke Saint Lucy to help give us greater clarity in our day to day lives.

Looks like pretty awesome stuff, y’all. Definitely right up *my* alley, anyway!

Hoodoo Rootworker’s Seven-Way Rosary Chaplet – SOLD

Available through Seraphin Station, this rosary is handmade with a mix of pressed glass and Czech glass beads, each decade being separately attached to the center ring — a finger rosary — and embellished with a focal Pater bead of pressed glass, Czech glass, or in one case recycled sandcast glass. Whether you want to see this as a charm collection on a charm hanger displaying seven individual chaplets or single-decade rosaries, or as a sort of deconstructed All Saints’ rosary for contemporary rootworkers, this is a striking and unusual piece created by a rootworker with over 35 years of experience working with the roots, rosaries, and these saints in the folk Catholic tradition.

Large, sturdy, colored aluminum jump rings connect each decade to the center ring, so it’s possible, should you ever want to, to remove the individual decades and treat them as separate single-decade chaplets. This could be useful if you are working intensively with one or some but not all of these saints or if you’re traveling and need to cut down on how much spiritual stuff you’re lugging around.

Saints are chosen for their importance in the spiritual landscape of deep South hoodoo rootwork, with an eye towards popularity and contemporary usage (in the sense that while 100 years ago, St. Dymphna was probably not petitioned so often in conjure, today she is an enormously popular saint invoked by folks from all kinds of backgrounds and in all kinds of folk belief contexts. So she’s here!)

It’s made with strands or decades for the following:

  • St. Gerard, patron of pregnancy and childbirth in the Catholic tradition, also represents Baron Samedi of Haitian vodou in some houses and temples. He is the patron of communication with the ancestors and the dead. On the other side of this medal is Our Lady of Perpetual Help pictured with Christ and the angels Michael and Gabriel. OL of Perpetual Help is called on for all kinds of things – in hoodoo in my region, it’s often against sickness, income uncertainty, hunger, and unstable households. She’s known to help with all of those things. She’s also associated in some houses and temples with the lwa Erzulie Danto.
  • St. Lazarus is the patron saint of lepers and against leprosy, and by extension against plague and pandemic in contemporary practice. He’s also sometimes invoked by beggars, the homeless, people with HIV/AIDS, people with Hansen’s disease, and those who have unusually close relationships with dogs. He represents the lwa Legba, the patron of Yoruban divination and master of the crossroads, in many temples and houses, so he’s a powerful ally in road opening work.
  • St. Expedite is the patron saint invoked for fast luck, for help breaking through obstacles, for help with procrastination, and, increasingly, in desperate cases, much like St. Jude. He’s also the patron of computer programmers. In some regions and in some houses, he’s associated with the Ghuede lwa who rule the crossroads between life and death, esp. Baron Samedi.
  • St. Jude, the patron invoked for hopeless causes, is also called on more generally in conjure for financial prosperity and stability and is a good ally for those whose livelihoods involve working with emotional clients/customers and whose incomes can fluctuate for a host of reasons.
  • St. Christopher is the patron saint of travelers, children, and boat captains, invoked for safe travel. In some houses in New Orleans Voodoo, in which Santeria has had a noticeable influence, he is associated with the orisha Agayu. He presents his devotees with difficult obstacles but also grants them the inner power to overcome those trials and grow strong enough to carry all burdens.
  • St. Philomena is widely considered a miracle worker invoked by devotees for all kinds of things when other measures have failed. She’s the patron of babies and children and is considered the patroness of the living rosary. In some houses and temples, she is a lwa in her own right, seen as a helpful and pleasant spirit who helps those who make their livings as market sellers, removes negativity and evil from the surroundings, and grants the ability to have prophetic dreams.
  • St. Joseph is the patron saint of happy death, carpenters, stepfathers, and workers more generally, invoked in all kinds of situations to do with the financial wellbeing of a family and/or household, but especially petitioned by those seeking employment. He’s also called on by folks who need to sell their house. He’s associated with the lwa Papa Loko, the originary houngan and healer. St. Dymphna is on the reverse side of this medal. She is widely invoked against mental illness, anxiety, and depression, and she’s the patron of incest survivors and teenage runaways.

Some of these associations vary by region and the religious background of the practitioner, so I don’t mean to imply here that most modern rootworkers work with St. Gerard because of his association with a particular lwa in Haitian sevis. Most rootworkers do no such thing. Hoodoo and vodou are of course two distinct traditions, the former being folk magic and the latter being a religion. In Louisiana, though, especially New Orleans and surrounding areas, there is a strain of practice where the two are often blended to a greater extent than elsewhere as a result of the city’s unique history.

Continue reading “Hoodoo Rootworker’s Seven-Way Rosary Chaplet – SOLD”

St. Anthony of Padua material updated

anthony post cover (1)The St. Anthony material from the FAQ Directory has been consolidated, updated, and  moved to its own page, with lots of linked sources and resources.

Coming soon, I hope: St. Anthony chaplets and maybe a few pakets, too.

photos

feb 2013 honey jars
Success / Prosperity altars (c) Karma Zain 2013

2013-03-20 22.53.32
Custom rosary made for a contest winner (c) Karma Zain 2013

shamim fwop binding tray end
Finishing up some Binding/Hot Foot work (c) Karma Zain 2013

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Sacred Heart Carnival Necklace (c) Karma Zain 2013

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St. Philomena Chaplet (c) Karma Zain 2013

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Custom spiritual jewelry for a client’s specific spiritual goal (c) Karma Zain 2013

New jewelry at ebay and eventually bonanza


St. Peter Keys necklace – leather, vintage skeleton key (SOLD)

Gheude, Manman Brigitte, Baron, Voodoo bracelet – at ebay

St. Philomena chaplet bracelet – at ebay


Erzulie Dantor charm bracelet (SOLD)

Mercury Dime protection bracelet – at ebay


St. Peter's Keys necklace – St Livinus – adjustable – at ebay


Legba rosary charm bracelet – handpainted medal (SOLD)

rosaries, chaplets, malas, and prayer beads (subtitled, something to offend just about everyone)

A customer writes to ask how folks use voodoo rosaries – are you supposed to just pray a regular rosary with them, like with Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be?

Now, as far as I know, there was no such thing as specifically voodoo rosaries before I started making them.  I started making them because I wanted some and couldn’t find such a thing.  There are voodoo rosaries out there now, besides mine, from sellers who have apparently been inspired by my work, and I choose to take this as flattering.  But I bring all this up because, as these are something of an innovation, there is definitely no "one true way" to "say" or use a voodoo rosary.

Continue reading “rosaries, chaplets, malas, and prayer beads (subtitled, something to offend just about everyone)”

Chaplet of the Five Wounds

I made this last night as the latest in a series of one of a kind rosaries designed specifically for esoteric prayer.  Faceted glass beads, Murano style red heart beads, and a hand-blown (technically, mouth-blown!) teardrop shaped centerpiece provide a setting for the coolest little crucifix – it’s from Jerusalem and has a little tiny heart in relief at each point of the crucifix.

For more info, see the ebay listing.

damballah wedo chaplet (SOLD)


damballah wedo chaplet
Originally uploaded by Karma Zain

Silver-foil lined Murano glass medallion beads separate white cat’s eye beads and pumpkin-cut clear glass beads. Terminates with a silver toned snake pendant and a silver-toned filigree egg-shaped pendant.

rosary of the seven rays (SOLD)


rosary of the seven rays
Originally uploaded by Karma Zain

This rosary is made of pressed glass pumpkin-cut beads in seven decades: pink, dark blue, sky blue, red, blue, black, and crystal. The centerpiece is an Italian glass medallion in blue and purple with a gold foil stripe, which terminates in three crystal beads and a large Murano glass heart pendant. Absolutely one of a kind.

This particular type of Rosary of the Seven Rays is used in devotions to the Seven Joys of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This devotional practice is a prayer and meditation method that can raise human consciousness, and this particular rosary is designed according to techniques that focus on the heart chakra. Thus it is an excellent tool for those working with esoteric prayer and those who need help in opening and balancing the heart chakra. It can also be prayed on behalf of those who need divine assistance with emotional and spiritual imbalances and is a powerful tool in the arsenal of healers and lightworkers.

Entire piece is 22.5 inches long from end to end. Decade loop is 18".

This is a serious piece for the serious practitioner devoted to esoteric prayer. It won’t do you much good if you just keep it in its bag and look at it a couple of times a year – it’s not like a talisman you keep in your pocket. It’s more like a musical instrument — it’s designed to be used, and its powers increase with regular use.

Bishop Tau Michael Bertiaux says of the rosary, in his chapter on Upadhi I in The Voudon Gnostic Workbook, that prayer beads are among the most effective ways to generate spiritual energy and "hook up" to God energy. He conceives of the rosary as a "prayer machine" and emphasizes that the rosary is further blessed and empowered through use. I have blessed and empowered this rosary, but it will absorb deeper spiritual energies through your repeated use. For more information, see The Voudon Gnostic Workbook.

For info on the Seven Joys of Mary, go here.

For a Wikipedia entry on the Seven Rays, go here.  I don’t normally post links to Wikipedia entries (that is another rant entirely), but this one has a good references list and a good section on Further Reading.