Hoodoo Rootworker’s Seven-Way Rosary Chaplet – SOLD

Available through Seraphin Station, this rosary is handmade with a mix of pressed glass and Czech glass beads, each decade being separately attached to the center ring — a finger rosary — and embellished with a focal Pater bead of pressed glass, Czech glass, or in one case recycled sandcast glass. Whether you want to see this as a charm collection on a charm hanger displaying seven individual chaplets or single-decade rosaries, or as a sort of deconstructed All Saints’ rosary for contemporary rootworkers, this is a striking and unusual piece created by a rootworker with over 35 years of experience working with the roots, rosaries, and these saints in the folk Catholic tradition.

Large, sturdy, colored aluminum jump rings connect each decade to the center ring, so it’s possible, should you ever want to, to remove the individual decades and treat them as separate single-decade chaplets. This could be useful if you are working intensively with one or some but not all of these saints or if you’re traveling and need to cut down on how much spiritual stuff you’re lugging around.

Saints are chosen for their importance in the spiritual landscape of deep South hoodoo rootwork, with an eye towards popularity and contemporary usage (in the sense that while 100 years ago, St. Dymphna was probably not petitioned so often in conjure, today she is an enormously popular saint invoked by folks from all kinds of backgrounds and in all kinds of folk belief contexts. So she’s here!)

It’s made with strands or decades for the following:

  • St. Gerard, patron of pregnancy and childbirth in the Catholic tradition, also represents Baron Samedi of Haitian vodou in some houses and temples. He is the patron of communication with the ancestors and the dead. On the other side of this medal is Our Lady of Perpetual Help pictured with Christ and the angels Michael and Gabriel. OL of Perpetual Help is called on for all kinds of things – in hoodoo in my region, it’s often against sickness, income uncertainty, hunger, and unstable households. She’s known to help with all of those things. She’s also associated in some houses and temples with the lwa Erzulie Danto.
  • St. Lazarus is the patron saint of lepers and against leprosy, and by extension against plague and pandemic in contemporary practice. He’s also sometimes invoked by beggars, the homeless, people with HIV/AIDS, people with Hansen’s disease, and those who have unusually close relationships with dogs. He represents the lwa Legba, the patron of Yoruban divination and master of the crossroads, in many temples and houses, so he’s a powerful ally in road opening work.
  • St. Expedite is the patron saint invoked for fast luck, for help breaking through obstacles, for help with procrastination, and, increasingly, in desperate cases, much like St. Jude. He’s also the patron of computer programmers. In some regions and in some houses, he’s associated with the Ghuede lwa who rule the crossroads between life and death, esp. Baron Samedi.
  • St. Jude, the patron invoked for hopeless causes, is also called on more generally in conjure for financial prosperity and stability and is a good ally for those whose livelihoods involve working with emotional clients/customers and whose incomes can fluctuate for a host of reasons.
  • St. Christopher is the patron saint of travelers, children, and boat captains, invoked for safe travel. In some houses in New Orleans Voodoo, in which Santeria has had a noticeable influence, he is associated with the orisha Agayu. He presents his devotees with difficult obstacles but also grants them the inner power to overcome those trials and grow strong enough to carry all burdens.
  • St. Philomena is widely considered a miracle worker invoked by devotees for all kinds of things when other measures have failed. She’s the patron of babies and children and is considered the patroness of the living rosary. In some houses and temples, she is a lwa in her own right, seen as a helpful and pleasant spirit who helps those who make their livings as market sellers, removes negativity and evil from the surroundings, and grants the ability to have prophetic dreams.
  • St. Joseph is the patron saint of happy death, carpenters, stepfathers, and workers more generally, invoked in all kinds of situations to do with the financial wellbeing of a family and/or household, but especially petitioned by those seeking employment. He’s also called on by folks who need to sell their house. He’s associated with the lwa Papa Loko, the originary houngan and healer. St. Dymphna is on the reverse side of this medal. She is widely invoked against mental illness, anxiety, and depression, and she’s the patron of incest survivors and teenage runaways.

Some of these associations vary by region and the religious background of the practitioner, so I don’t mean to imply here that most modern rootworkers work with St. Gerard because of his association with a particular lwa in Haitian sevis. Most rootworkers do no such thing. Hoodoo and vodou are of course two distinct traditions, the former being folk magic and the latter being a religion. In Louisiana, though, especially New Orleans and surrounding areas, there is a strain of practice where the two are often blended to a greater extent than elsewhere as a result of the city’s unique history.

Continue reading “Hoodoo Rootworker’s Seven-Way Rosary Chaplet – SOLD”

new art shrines and altar pieces

Click the lj cut to see more pics of Gabriel, St. Expedite, OL of Czestochowa, and a non-denominational Love shrine.
New items at ebay and at bonanza.


see more pictures

New items at ebay and bonanza – jewelry and Sanguis Veneris

Somebody wrote me asking for a goat horn, and I said I’d order one from my "animal bits" supplier. I also said I was not likely to recall who asked me for it.  Sure enough, I forgot.  But I have a polished, hollow goat horn up on ebay for you. ETA: they found it and got it!



Santisima Muerte altar spell bottle, FIXED, customized, and chock full of herbs, roots, curios, etc.  Perfect for a spell of the Intranquil Spirit variety.

St. Expedite rosary bracelet with customizable spell pendant



Custom love-drawing mojo rosary bracelet
– non-denominational, but Erzulie Freda approved, and can be customized for her

***

Limited edition Sanguis Veneris oil and powder.

If you read my older post about Sanguis Veneris, you know it’s a medieval love and healing formula, and I wanted to give it a go even though it’s European and I no longer work too much in European herb-lore, because it has uses in conjure as well and because the astrological event for its creation happened to be coming up. So I went ahead and took this astrological opportunity to make up a batch of Sanguis Veneris oil (HIGHLY concentrated, quite thick and full of powdered resins and herbs, so dilute, dilute, dilute) and powder (pure, 100% powdered herbs and resins, NO base or filler or mineral ingredients). The oil can be worn (see caveats below), used to dress candles, mojos, objects, etc, just like any condition oil.  The powder can be burned as incense on a charcoal block, added to mojos, added to a base oil to make your own oil, etc.  Caution: MAY STAIN SKIN if a lot is used, WILL STAIN FABRIC etc so handle with care, especially in concentrated amounts.

This formula does NOT contain human blood, just plant matter and essential oils.  It was made in a ritual context under the appropriate astrological conditions and set under the light of the full moon.  (My initial formal hands-on training in herblore was in European traditions, so I do know how to do this stuff even though I work primarily in African-American herblore, and I spent nearly two decades as an initiate in a couple of formal hermetic, ceremonial magic, wand-waving and robe-wearing and qabala-using traditions and do know my astrology, sigils, grimoires, K and C of the HGA etc as well, so I broke out some of the old altar implements for this one). It does not contain anything that is not theoretically safe for use on skin, and I tested it on myself before listing it, but as with ANY ritual oil, you might want to dilute it and do a spot test before wearing it, and you wouldn’t use it as a perfume but rather as a ritual anointing oil. 

It *may* stain your skin – there is no way to avoid that given the ingredients – but if used in small enough quantities and away from white clothing, you might be alright. You might not want to dab it behind your ears, of course, but you could use it similarly to body paint and paint symbols or sigils on yourself, or dab it at appropriate spots (at the heart and right above the pubic bone below your navel would be good places) or, if your lover is adventurous, on him or her.  However, please note that it is not edible and would taste absolutely horrible, and should not be used as a personal lubricant nor on any areas where you want someone’s mouth to go.)  You can also use it to paint your lover’s name on the soles of your feet to put a little "commanding" action into your love workings.  (You can use a toothpick if you don’t have a paintbrush that’s that small).  I tried the foot-painting trick and it did not stain the bottom of my foot, and I dabbed a bit on my wrists and it did not stain my skin, but I can’t promise that it won’t stain you.

If you wanted to dilute this in a carrier oil I would try about half a dropper per half ounce of oil.  At that level it may still stain clothing (when I say it may stain, I don’t mean it won’t ever wash off with soap and water, but it may take a few washings to fade completely if you use it undiluted, or it may not wash completely out of whites).  You could also just add a few drops to a carrier oil for a lighter blend, and/or add a few drops to another type of love or lust condition oil, or to a bath salt base or incense powder base.  The scent is very lightly sweet.  If you dilute it you may not smell anything, so it becomes a matter of personal preference.  Just because you can’t smell it doesn’t mean it’s not working though.

If you prefer, you could add a drop or two to your favorite ritual or anointing oil if you use such on your skin (please note my usual caveats about my own oils – they are generally not designed for use on skin unless the listing specifically says so, and will nearly always need to be diluted to proper skin-safe levels if you decide to wear them).

This thick mixture makes a fabulous candle dressing and the powder makes a fascinating, unusual incense.  You can certainly add a pinch of it to a less expensive incense blend to stretch it out (and I would advise it – uncut, this can be almost too thick and heady, and it does have a slightly bitter undertone and lots of resins in it).  A little of this goes a long, long way.  You could also dress your candle with another condition oil or plain olive oil and sprinkle the powder on the candle,  or roll your candle in it. 

This blend would be especially appropriate when you’re trying to draw a lover with the means and desire to give you lots of gifts, attention, money etc, or to get your current lover to loosen up on the purse strings a little bit. It’s also appropriate for situations where you are concerned that people NOT gossip or spread rumors about your relationship, if for any reason you need to keep it under wraps, so in that particular area it has a protective quality (though it can’t be expected to totally hide crimes or affairs all on its own!).  If people are gossiping about you because they are jealous of your looks or love life, this can help with that sort of thing.  Finally, it can be used in spellwork to cool off hot tempers in a relationship and put the love back in the center – it’s not a reconciliation oil exactly, it won’t just heal up all difficulties and it wouldn’t work alone to return a lost lover, but it can turn the volume down on the anger and turn the volume up on the love and remembering why you got together in the first place.

From a hoodoo perspective, the ingredients in this blend are healing, relaxing, protective (especially from those telling lies), good for sensual love, and good for money-protection and money-drawing.  So this isn’t a "true sweet romance" love formula, and it’s not a "Fiery Love" blend, but it definitely has sexual/sensual overtones, and within a certain sphere, it’s definitely a multi-purpose oil.

Limited edition – once it’s gone, it’s gone, at least until the next appropriate astrological event comes around.

Finally, remember that everything you see at ebay can also be had at bonanza, often at a discount (chicken, turkey, and alligator feet excluded).

new st. expedite shrine (SOLD)


DSC05898
Originally uploaded by Karma Zain

I’ve been working on this off and on for about a year and finally finished it this weekend. It’s made out of an old recycled clock case I got at a thrift store in Alabama, which is so very very appropriate for St. Expedite. Mixed media: resin, fabric, enamel, acrylic, oil paints, paper, glass, and real genuine plastic Mardi Gras beads. Oh, and black feathers. And gold plastic horseshoes. I dont’ care if it never sells – I like looking at it so much I don’t mind keeping it for myself.

hand painted saints medals

Collection of various hand painted saints medals, including St. Cyprian and two for the Ghuedes.

St. Expedite bar soap – EXCLUSIVE


Picture 235-1
Originally uploaded by Karma Zain

Hand-crafted, goat’s milk soap made by Heart and Dart exclusively for Karma Zain Spiritual Supplies, developed using Karma Zain’s proprietary formula. These four-ounce bars of soap are natural, long lasting, fully cured, chock full of essential oils and herbs, and contain NO sodium lauryl sulfate or other nasty detergents.

Available ONLY at Karma Zain Spiritual Supplies.

st. expedite chaplet (SOLD)


st. expedite rosary
Originally uploaded by Karma Zain

This chaplet is completely handmade, which is a colossal pain in the rear end, but I think it turned out pretty well. Definitely one of a kind. St. Expedite is called on for fast luck, to break through obstacles, and for an end to procrastination, and is often considered the patron saint of computer programmers.

Measures just over ten inches from end to end. Decade loop is about 8.5 inches. Made with pressed glass and Czech glass beads. Centerpiece is a red and gold foil Murano style glass bead. Decade markers are red and gold foil lined glass beads. Medal is pewter, imported from Italy.

Part of the proceeds from voodoo rosary sales go to Fonkoze.org.
Fonkoze is a Haitian foundation that supports the organized poor, providing them with essential banking services throughout the country and assisting borrowers with literacy, business training and health education.

ETA: SOLD

More on St. Expedite

In Vol. 2 of Hyatt (pp 1373-74), there is a description of a working to ask St. Expedite to send someone out of your life.  This informant came from Algiers, and the description sheds some light on the uses of differing candle colors to use with St. Expedite (click the tag “St. Expedite” for previous posts).

According to Nahnee, the “Boss of Algiers,” St. Expedite is a “saint of many colors.”  In this working, one burns a different color candle every day for nine days.  In the midst of Hyatt’s rather arrogant commentary about getting a “logical answer” when he repeats the question (he appears to think that the “logical answer” involves the sort of clothing the saint was used to wearing), you can pick out the idea that St. Expedite is a multifaceted saint who isn’t one to be pigeonholed too readily as only doing one certain kind of work.  Thus with his candles, at least for the driving away type of work, “today yo’ll burn a red light, tomorrah yo’ll burn a green light, tomorrah a yellah light.” 

I’m not sure the order of the lights is important — later, Hyatt “repeats” [oh the irony in the way this word is used in this transcription] the directions: “Well, now, I begin and I light a red light today. I just let it burn.
Tomorrow I will light a green light and let it burn. Then tomorrow a blue. You light a different color candle every day for nine days.”
The informant replies with a “yes.”  So either the informant was sick of him, or else it didn’t matter what order the colors went. In any case, I find this interesting in light of previous posts and commentary about colors used with St. Expedite, and it makes a certain sort of sense that the color will vary depending on the nature of the work.

In a previous post, dayglow_pirate remarked that he had spoken with some women, “Catholic spiritualists of African/Haitian descent” in the area of Charleston, South Carolina, who used primarily yellow candles for St. Expedite.  So the regional variations appear to be at wprk, still.  (Thanks for the info!)

St. Expedite candles and colors

Now, I love me some St. Expedite. He has almost never let me down.  Around here, we burn red candles to him, though I have heard some practitioners say they were taught to use yellow.  (I’ve never heard that from somebody who learned from a person rather than a book though.  I”m not sure where it came from or if it’s regional.  Would love to hear other St. Expedite traditions if readers have any.)

Anyway, in Harry Middleton Hyatt, a New Orleans informant talks about burning pink and blue candles to St. Expedite while praying to him.  The saint can be petitioned to “make your husband be good to you,” “for work, money,” to “open the way for you.”  The informant goes on to mention the pink and blue candles and say that these — apparently the color selection — are for “love, true love, and for what you want – in asking him for money and things, for true things, for him to do truthful for you.”*

This emphasis on truth isn’t common around here, nor is it common anymore from what I hear people say about him. Folks around here ask St. Expedite for anything — to clear obstacles quickly, for quick results, for help ending procrastination.  They are more likely to go to another saint for matters of love and truth.  Quite interesting.

I love this stuff.

* This is in v. 2, p. 1406.